covid pandemic – Tavistock Devon http://tavistockdevon.com/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 18:50:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tavistockdevon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png covid pandemic – Tavistock Devon http://tavistockdevon.com/ 32 32 Good Day Atlanta Viewer Information: February 21, 2022 https://tavistockdevon.com/good-day-atlanta-viewer-information-february-21-2022/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 16:40:06 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/good-day-atlanta-viewer-information-february-21-2022/

The auction highlights items belonging to the iconic Atlanta family:

From a charcoal portrait by Norman Rockwell to a vintage platinum and diamond engagement ring, one-of-a-kind items from one of Atlanta’s most iconic families will go on sale this weekend.

Atlanta’s Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery will hold a virtual auction on Saturday, February 26 featuring over 400 lots from the estate of Nell & Robert Woodruff.

Robert Winship Woodruff was a Georgia native who served as president of The Coca-Cola Company from 1923 to 1955 and continued to guide the company until his death in 1985. Woodruff married Nell Kendall Hodgson of Athens in 1912, and both were active in the community throughout their lives; the Woodruff name remains well known in Atlanta thanks to places like the Woodruff Art Center in Midtown and Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing.

Ahlers & Ogletree employees say the auctioned items came from the couple’s quartet of homes, including their Tuxedo Road estate known as Windcrofte. Auction lots include a portrait of George Washington painted by fellow President Dwight D. Eisenhower (a friend of the Woodruffs) and a portrait of Robert Woodruff by legendary artist Norman Rockwell. Also on sale are Nell Woodruff’s Tiffany art deco jewelry and various Coca-Cola memorabilia.

Due to the ongoing pandemic, Saturday’s auction will be entirely virtual and the public can attend for free. Live bidding begins at 10 a.m. For more information on the auction and to view the lots, click here. And hit the video player for our exclusive live auction preview on Good Day Atlanta!

Dr. Neil Winawer joins us to learn more about the COVID-19 pandemic: For more on Dr. Neil Winawer from Emory School of Medicine, visit his Instagram @neilwinwaer

Isha Blakker and Brandon Black will star in Tyler Perry’s upcoming film, “A Madea Homecoming”: “A Madea Homecoming” continues to follow the journey of Perry’s infamous character, Madea, as she prepares to welcome her family who have come to town to celebrate her great-grandson’s college graduation, when some hidden secrets threaten to destroy the family’s happy homecoming. The film is set to release on Netflix on February 25, 2022. Watch the trailer here.

Cooking Segment with Miller Union Pastry Chef Claudia Martinez: Pastry chef Claudia Martinez prepares for James Beard Foundation’s Taste America, Atlanta, Tuesday, February 22. Claudia is pastry chef at Miller Union, one of the top restaurants in the area by James Beard Award winner Steven Satterfield, and her nomination was recently named Atlanta Magazine’s Top Career Move of 2021.

For the event, Claudia bakes a new twist on a Southern classic, pineapple upside-down cake, with a bit of Latin influence from sweet plantains and coconut.

Radio host Mani Millss talks about the latest entertainment news: The hit ’90s sitcom “Martin” will forever be a cultural staple. BET+ has announced that they will be doing a 30-year reunion with the cast on their platform. Mani Millss let us know what to expect and when we can watch.

]]> Plan of the first bus information kiosk for Weymouth seafront https://tavistockdevon.com/plan-of-the-first-bus-information-kiosk-for-weymouth-seafront/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/plan-of-the-first-bus-information-kiosk-for-weymouth-seafront/ A NEW information kiosk on Weymouth seafront is planned to help bus users this summer.

The 6 square meter building would be open from 9am to 5pm all week and weekends for First Bus – located between two existing bus shelters on the beach side of the Esplanade.

An officer’s letter with the planning request indicates that improving services for passengers and potential bus users is essential to increasing bus use, as well as improving existing services and networks.

“As Weymouth emerges from another winter badly affected by the Covid 19 pandemic, the summer of 2022 will be crucial for the recovery of the local economy.

“As Weymouth’s main bus operator, First has always sought constructive partnerships with local authorities and we are proud of the productive and collaborative relationship we have with Dorset Council, Weymouth City Council and other local authorities. of our network.

“We are keenly aware and proud of the crucial role that bus services play, both for local people and our visitors, and we are delighted at the opportunity to continue to build on these achievements and help our beautiful piece of the world to emerge strong from the pandemic,” a statement read.

A similar First proposal was put forward by First last year, but the company later withdrew its application.



The company says kiosk staff will be able to provide real-time updates on services, information on bus times, ticket options, places to visit and more – helping to plan improving Dorset’s bus services which includes targets to increase bus use by 5% by 2025 and 15% by 2030 from 2019/20 levels.

“Making the buses as easy to use as possible will be crucial to meeting and exceeding these goals and the kiosk will play an important role here. Especially considering the influx of visitors to Weymouth each summer, who will not necessarily be familiar with the local bus network,’ the request told Dorset Council.

The kiosk is intended for use from February to October only and will be removed during the winter months.

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Hoi An Ancient Town – Asia’s leading cultural destination attraction | Culture – Sports https://tavistockdevon.com/hoi-an-ancient-town-asias-leading-cultural-destination-attraction-culture-sports/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 03:03:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/hoi-an-ancient-town-asias-leading-cultural-destination-attraction-culture-sports/
Visitors visit Hoi An (Photo: VNA)

Hanoi (VNA) – Enter the Hoi An ancient town in the south-central province of Quang Namvisitors can deeply feel a diverse and artistic blend of architectural works typical of Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese and French cultures.

After two quiet years due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Hoi An is bustling again as it is one of two destinations selected by provincial authorities to reopen its doors to international tourists.

Located in the lower course of the Thu Bon River in the coastal plain of Quang Nam province, about 30 km south of Da Nang city, Hoi An is known in the international market by various names such as Lam Ap, Faifo, Hoai Pho and Hoi. A. The only Southeast Asian port market in Vietnam and very rare in the world, Hoi An preserves nearly 1,360 architectural remains intact. These include streets, houses, assembly halls, communal houses, pagodas, shrines, clan houses, ancient wells and tombs. They exhibit both the characteristics of traditional Vietnamese art and the convergence of Eastern and Western cultures.

Hoi An Ancient Town - Asia's top cultural destination attraction hinh anh 2Tourists discover Hoi An after two years of disruption due to COVID-19 (Photo: VNA)

The cultural and economic exchanges that took place from the 16th to the 19th century left in ancient Hoi An most of the forms of Vietnam’s ancient architecture, bringing together the traditional national arts enriched with sketches of foreign arts.

Scholars argue that Hoi An’s ancient architecture was renewed in the early 19th century, but the real starting point could be much older. Ancient architecture is most visible in the ancient quarter located inside Minh An district, covering about 2 km2 and housing most of Hoi An’s famous relics.

The streets of the old quarter are short, narrow and intersecting.

The architectural works there were mainly constructed from traditional materials, including brick and wood, and did not exceed two storeys.

It is easy for tourists to recognize the traces of time not only in the architectural design of each construction but everywhere else, moss-covered tiled roofs, walls, carvings depicting some strange creature or ancient history. It is a convergence of Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese and Cham artisans. Each construction still bears the cultural characteristics of many nations. At present, Hoi An is still home to thousands of residents, serving as a living museum in terms of architecture and urban lifestyle.

Through the centuries, the customs and practices, rituals, cultural and belief activities and traditional foods of Hoi An are still kept and preserved with generations of ancient street people. The city also enjoys a healthy and peaceful natural environment with small suburban villages engaged in crafts such as carpentry and pottery.

After testing negative for COVID-19, the first foreign visitors under the “vaccine passport” pilot program toured the ancient city on November 11.

Vice Chairman of Hoi An People’s Committee Nguyen Van Lanh expressed his gratitude to visitors for choosing Hoi An as the first destination of their Vietnam trip.

It took great efforts from local authorities and people over the past two years to be able to welcome foreign tourists again and make Hoi An a safe and friendly destination, he said, adding that ‘he expects to see Hoi An and Quang Nam reclaim its reputation.

On December 4, 1999, in the city of Marrakech in Morocco, the 23rd session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee officially included the ancient city of Hoi An in the list of world cultural heritage sites.

He is honored by many famous travel magazines. In July 2019, with 90.39 points, Hoi An was elected by the Travel magazine Travel and Leisure as the most attractive city in the world that year. It is also the first tourist site in Vietnam honored by the Google Doodle./.

ANV

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The Humboldt campsite, a tourist information center, received 3,000 visitors in 2021 https://tavistockdevon.com/the-humboldt-campsite-a-tourist-information-center-received-3000-visitors-in-2021/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 16:37:10 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/the-humboldt-campsite-a-tourist-information-center-received-3000-visitors-in-2021/

Most of the 3,000 guests, 62 percent, were from Saskatchewan.

HUMBOLDT – During the summer season, the Humboldt Campground and Tourist Information Center received over 3,000 guests, 62 percent from Saskatchewan.

Other provinces represented include 22 percent of Alberta, six percent of British Columbia, six percent of Manitoba, two percent of Ontario, and one percent of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. of Prince Edward Island.

That’s according to the Humboldt & District Chamber of Commerce, which submitted the figures to the town of Humboldt in a report presented to council in December.

“2021 has continued to be strongly affected by the dramatic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic,” wrote Brent Fitzpatrick, executive director of the chamber.

“The uncertainty centered on interprovincial travel, not to mention international, thus creating a decline in our camping rentals. “

While the pandemic has caused a decline in the number of visitors overall, Fitzpatrick said workers remaining in the area for construction work resulted in a slight upturn. In particular, he noted that they were “lucky” to have the company that was building the new Pattison Ag building outside of the city that stays next door.

For more convenience, the company proposed to install a new large capacity septic tank between sites 12 and 13. The project, approved by the city’s planning department, will allow the campsite to have two sites that can be used seasonally without having to move the camper at any time.

“At the end of the year, we were flat until 2020, which was also a year of challenges for the campsite and the tourist information kiosk. “

Long-term maintenance for campsite staff has involved the felling of nearly 48 old trees over the past two years, many eclipsed sites that have been identified as a potential hazard in strong winds. In addition, during the year, all picnic tables, electrical terminals and sign posts on the site were cleaned and painted.

“Additionally, we enjoyed sharing our site and the adventures it offers with the Humboldt Boy Scout Troop, Public School Daycare and other youth organizations,” said Fitzpatrick. “Having these large groups of kids, running around our campsite, enjoying nature in a safe, fun and educational way was very rewarding.”

He noted that their optimism is high for a better return on investment for 2022 through continued vaccination efforts, but the Humboldt & District Chamber of Commerce is also very cautious in the face of market volatility, with “caution” being the key. new year keyword.

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NiMet identifies weather information challenges for farmers – NiMET DG – Blueprint Newspapers Limited https://tavistockdevon.com/nimet-identifies-weather-information-challenges-for-farmers-nimet-dg-blueprint-newspapers-limited/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:25:18 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/nimet-identifies-weather-information-challenges-for-farmers-nimet-dg-blueprint-newspapers-limited/

The Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NiMet) has identified traditional beliefs, highly technical scientific information, poor communications, language barrier, among others, as key challenges in providing agrometeorological information to farmers in the country.

To meet the challenges and ensure that its products and services reach the required destinations and achieve the desired impacts, NiMET Managing Director Prof. Mansur Bako Matazu said the agency relies on partnerships and collaborations, thanks to to whom she was able to reach several clients. over the years with testimonials and positive feedback.

The aim of such a partnership, he said, was to involve stakeholders on their role in the co-production and co-ownership of agrometeorological products for effective understanding and use of the products, as promoted by NiMet and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Matazu pointed out that it also provides NiMet with a platform to develop a sustainable communication channel to end users and better appreciate the needs of stakeholders.

He NiMet spoke as the keynote speaker at the one-day workshop on Developing a Feedback Framework for the Delivery of Climate Information Services in Nigeria in Lagos.

According to Matazu, “One of these partnerships is the one with the Human and Environmental Development Program (HEDA) which started in 2018 and has peaked to date. Some of the activities include: the 2018 Feed Future Africa (AGROCONNECT) workshop held in Lagos, Nigeria ”

He noted that in 2020 a dialogue on Improving the delivery of agro-meteorological information services for resilient food systems in Nigeria: challenges, perspectives and partnerships was conducted, adding that despite the COVID-19 pandemic , a virtual reduction in the NiMet Seasonal Climate Prediction (SCP) was conducted that covered over a thousand key farmers, extension workers and other stakeholders during the Covid-19 lockdown in ten -nine northern states and the CTF, including production of a weather information manual for farmers.

“Finally, in December 2021, public meetings were held in Adamawa, Nasarawa, Kwara, Ogun and Oyo states on the theme:” The role of stakeholders in making the SCP effective in strengthening the resilience of our food systems. “

Matazu congratulated the management of the Human and Environmental Development Program (HEDA) under the supervision of Mr. Arigbabu Sulaimon and the whole HEDA family for the impacts recorded in the agricultural value chain through the use of weather and climate information and their applications in the promotion of Food Safety.

According to the NiMet Boss Climate Change Adaptation and Agribusiness Support Program (CASP) which covered 104 LGAs and 727 villages with more than 60,000 farmers and extension workers were trained in the states of Jigawa, Katsina, Borno, Kebbi, Sokoto, Yobe and Zamfara between 2017 and 2021.

He said the agency maintains strong and effective collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, the Agricultural Research Institute (IAR) on Climate Smart Villages, the International Institute of Agriculture. (IITA) on Climate-Smart Farming Practices, the Center for Dry-Land Agriculture (CDA), USAID Market, state governments and other key MDAs to provide agrometeorological information to farming communities across the country.

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City of Dighton shares information on updated COVID-19 contact tracing protocols https://tavistockdevon.com/city-of-dighton-shares-information-on-updated-covid-19-contact-tracing-protocols/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 19:24:52 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/city-of-dighton-shares-information-on-updated-covid-19-contact-tracing-protocols/

For immediate release

DIGHTON – City administrator Michael Mullen would like to provide an update on the individual case investigation and contact tracing process for COVID-19 cases.

The Town of Dighton continues to prioritize contact tracing for residents of the community. The Selectmen board of directors recently approved the use of $ 5,000 funding from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) to help fund contact tracing efforts and the city is in the process of hiring. a contact tracer.

The contact tracer will join the efforts of the Dighton public health nurse and board of health staff who provided contact tracing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

In early December, state contact tracing protocols were updated by the Department of Public Health. Local contact tracing efforts are now prioritizing contacts with only those who test positive for COVID-19. People who test positive are encouraged to notify their own close contacts. Close contact is anyone of whom an individual has been within 6 feet for a combined total of 15 minutes or more in a 24 hour period in the 48 hours prior to the onset of an individual’s symptoms.

“The Town of Dighton has remained vigilant over the past 20 months and continues to place the health, safety and well-being of our community members as a top priority,” said Town Administrator Mullen. . “We have and will continue to closely monitor the test positivity rate within our community as we seek to limit the spread of COVID-19 among our residents, employees and visitors. “

The City of Dighton encourages residents to continue doing their part to stop the spread of COVID-19. This includes:

  • If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, even mild ones, contact your health care provider and arrange for a test at the nearest testing site.
  • Isolate if you are positive and let your contacts know that you saw them 48 hours before your symptoms started.
  • Stay informed via the Massachusetts DPH COVID-19 website here.
  • Wear face masks when in municipal buildings or when interacting with the public.

Stay informed
The Town’s Pandemic Task Force continues to meet and will provide further updates and recommendations to the Board of Directors and through the Town of Dighton website, the Dighton News Portal and the City’s social media accounts as they become available.

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Lachhi: a family’s efforts to promote the ancient city of Khokana into a modern tourist hub https://tavistockdevon.com/lachhi-a-familys-efforts-to-promote-the-ancient-city-of-khokana-into-a-modern-tourist-hub/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 03:30:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/lachhi-a-familys-efforts-to-promote-the-ancient-city-of-khokana-into-a-modern-tourist-hub/

After the massive earthquake of 2015, the ancient city of Khokana in the southern part of the Kathmandu Valley was devastated. It was the same with the family of Hari Nath Dangol. Like many physical structures in Khokana, Dangol’s ancestral home was destroyed in the earthquake.

“We were unable to rebuild our house on the land where our house was located due to problems with the land ownership certificate,” he shares. Meanwhile, Dangol realized that many families in the area shared his plight, fearing that the wait for reconstruction would set the entire colony back economically.

In their efforts to tackle this bear, Hari Nath Dangol and his two brothers, Jaa and Shiva, started a business using the space left vacant due to the delay in rebuilding the house. The company, named Lachhi, has been promoting local ethnic food, crafts and lifestyle among visitors to the ancient city, including foreigners and Nepalese, for two years, with promising potential. to stimulate the local economy.

Problems leading to ideation

Before the earthquake, the people of Khokana had traditional style houses while most of them made a living from traditional agriculture. There were very few locals who owned their own businesses or had jobs. “As a result, it has become very difficult for the residents to rebuild their homes. They had to opt to sell their arable land to generate funds, ”explains Hari Nath Dangol,“ After months of delay, we also sold our land.

Dangol shares: “But, to make up for the loss of the land, we (three brothers) always wanted to do something. In addition, after the earthquake, we felt that many responsibilities rested on our shoulders, including rebuilding our house, ensuring our professional growth and much more.

As they grappled with all of this, Khokana found himself embroiled in a dispute over the construction of the Kathmandu-Terai expressway. Even today, residents oppose the government’s plan to acquire their land for the ambitious project, fearing that they will once again lose their means of living.

Meanwhile, some residents have taken the initiative to organize the Khokana Tourism Festival-2020 to revive the tourism potential of Khokana devastated by the earthquake. It was in early 2020, just before the Covid-19 pandemic took hold of the world.

“Fears of losing their livelihood and the possibility of renewal, all of this became a push factor to open up Lachhi during the festival itself,” Dangol said.

Jaa Dangol, the youngest of the trio, had already developed an economic model adapted to the locality as part of her university project. Therefore, the brothers easily decided to turn this into reality immediately, according to Dangol.

During the three days of the festival, Lachhi achieved a turnover of around Rs 400,000. “Soon, the Covid-19 pandemic hit us. Few people are infected here too. For about two months, we shut down the operation completely, ”informs Dangol,“ However, we switched to fast food at that point, targeting local customers, to maintain. ”

As he shares, Lachhi is not making a profit at the moment. Nonetheless, he earns enough to maintain himself. She organizes various events for the promotion of the company.

Family efforts for the community

According to Dangol, the brothers invested around Rs 1 million in the company which they received in compensation for the loss of their land for the accelerated project. Otherwise, they had no money to start the business.

“Therefore, our father and the three of us worked as masons for the construction of this building (where they run the business today). We used all the lumber and bricks that were in usable condition from our destroyed house to build Lachhi.

Even today, Lachhi employs family members and other villagers to serve food etc.

Hari Nath Dangol, co-founder of Lachhi. Photo: Aryen Dhimal

“We want Lachhi to be a local hub, where creative ideas and social ideas are discussed,” Dangol shares, “There are very few shops here that document Khokana village and its culture, and educate visitors about Khokana. We also want to fill this gap.

Currently, Lachhi is working on three ideas: ethnic food, ethnic crafts and ethnic life. It promotes and markets varieties of artisanal hay products, including sukul, hay shoes, knitted bags and clothing such as gunyu-cholos. Most of them are produced by local women.

In addition, Lacchi also markets pure mustard oil from Khokana, local organic rice, vegetables and herbal products. It also allows visitors to experience local activities including oil processing with traditional technology, handicrafts, rice planting and other agricultural activities.

Plans galore

Dangol says his team are now eager to start and promote a community host family in Khokana. “We saw this magnitude very early on, especially after the earthquake. Community foster care can be one of the means of economically empowering residents.

As the people of Khokana do not easily let other people stay in their communities for fear of disrupting the local culture, the Lachhi team works with local youth clubs, women’s groups and the local government, according to Dangol. “We have invited Nepalese and foreign guests and offered them the cultural experience of Khokana at different festivals over the past two years.”

A local woman cooks Yomari in Lachhi’s kitchen. Photo: Aryen Dhimal

Dangol says he already has a plan for when to do what for visitors. “For example, a day before Mha Puja, another jatra takes place in Khokana. We plan to bring the guests that day and they will stay with the host family until the next day.

“We plan to execute this plan, first selecting around two to three houses in each neighborhood, then setting up their own committee and managing the host family accordingly. We have also informed the local elected representatives of this plan and they have responded positively, ”says Dangol.

It will take a lot of investment to integrate the whole community into the host family. But, it is possible that it will become a reality, believes Dangol.

Prior to that, Lachhi now plans to train residents in the management of host families in collaboration with the parish office.

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EDITORIAL: Misleading COVID Information Regarding Colorado Hospitals? https://tavistockdevon.com/editorial-misleading-covid-information-regarding-colorado-hospitals/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 14:24:38 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/editorial-misleading-covid-information-regarding-colorado-hospitals/

But now the [ambulance] The team is called upon to move patients more frequently and over greater distances, as hospital beds in the relatively nearby towns of Montrose and Grand Junction are filled with covid-19 patients. The team routinely drive patients to Denver, which is about three hours and 40 minutes from Gunnison …

– from an article by the journalist By Helen Santoro, “As hospitals fill up, paramedics spend more time moving patients, less in emergency”, on Kaiser Health News (KHN), December 17, 2021.

You can’t always believe what you read in the news.

We understand that everyone exaggerates from time to time. It’s human nature to try to sell our perspective by making a situation look worse (or better) than the facts suggest. An exaggeration can be outrageous and obvious … but often it is subtle and barely noticeable.

One of those subtle exaggerations may have surfaced in Ms. Santoro’s recent article in the Kaiser Health News, when she said hospital beds in Grand Junction and Montrose, Colo. Are “full of patients. covid-19 ”.

If indeed the hospital beds in Grand Junction and Montrose are “filled with covid-19 patients” – that puts them in a completely different category from the rest of Colorado, where, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE ), only 16% of hospital beds in the state are occupied by confirmed or “suspected” COVID patients. (Data as of Saturday, December 18.)

A CBS News report states that 25% of hospitalized “COVID patients” are actually treated for a different disease, but are found to be positive for COVID.

Colorado hospital beds could indeed be “full” … but not necessarily with COVID cases. The “number of approved beds” is not the whole story either.

Ms. Santoro’s article on KHN was not the only recent story that may contain potentially misleading information about the COVID crisis in Colorado. Here is an excerpt from another KHN article by Colorado Public Radio reporter John Daley posted on December 15:

Burch has battled chronic osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and has had two major bowel surgeries. A specialist he was consulting left his practice last year. Another would not accept his assurance. Then, on November 1, he started to experience severe stomach pain.

“When we talk about terrible problems, I cannot leave the house,” he said. He hasn’t eaten anything substantial in three weeks, he added.

Burch had to wait that long to be seen by a primary care doctor. He said the doctor told him, “If things were different I would tell you to go to the hospital and get diagnosed, do some tests and see what’s going on with you. But he said, “As of this day, the Delta County Hospital is clearly full. There are no beds available.

The covid ‘delta’ variant has overwhelmed the county of the same name in Colorado. Hospitals on the West Slope have been slammed for weeks, and the situation statewide is just as grim. Since Monday, the state coronavirus website reported 1,294 hospitalized patients with covid-19. Half of the state’s hospitals said they expected a staff shortage in mid-December; more than a third of them anticipated at the same time a shortage of beds in their intensive care units.

As the increase in the number of cases in November continues a downward trend in Colorado, we read this claim that 1,294 patients are “hospitalized with covid-19.” What we didn’t read in Mr. Daley’s article is that Colorado has about 12,558 approved hospital beds.

Ten times more beds than COVID patients.

But we also hear, from Mr. Daly, talk about “a lack of personnel in mid-December …”

It turns out that in Colorado and elsewhere, the “number of available beds” has less to do with the actual “number of approved beds” than with the “shortage of nurses needed to care for the people in those beds.”

A Article by reporter Shaun Boyd, published by CBS News last month, includes a story about Stevie Silvers, the head nurse of the surgical unit at UCHealth’s Poudre Valley Hospital, who was laid off from her job. According to the story, Ms Silvers – who was named Nurse of the Year amid the COVID-19 pandemic – had filed a religious exemption to the COVID vaccine … so her employer asked her to take a COVID test every 72 hours.

She had a bad reaction to the nasal exchange tests and had requested a saliva test instead. Rather than respond to her request, the hospital fired her. Mr. Boyd’s article quotes Ms. Silvers:

“In the height of such a deadly disease and pandemic, when it’s so important to have everyone on deck, how can they consider someone disposable right now?”

UCHealth’s Poudre Valley Hospital, where Silvers was the nurse in charge of the surgical unit, suffers from such a severe staff shortage that federal health workers have been called in.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment says an increase in COVID cases is straining hospitals. Silvers says the numbers don’t tell the whole story.

“We have a population that includes our COVID patients that we wouldn’t have had two years ago, but that doesn’t say why our hospitals are full the way they are.”

Mr. Boyd also quotes Colleen Casper, director of the Colorado Nurses Association:

“We have a very big gap between the accuracy of what is reported and the decisions that are made. I get calls every day from tearful nurses, describing what the patients are going through, and they are powerless to do anything because there just aren’t enough of them.

Nurse Stevie Silvers agrees with this analysis of Colorado hospital policies.

… “It’s not a problem having the beds, it’s a problem not having the staff and being willing to force the staff good enough and ready to work during a pandemic.” “

Bill hudson

Bill hudson

Bill Hudson began to share his opinions in the Pagosa’s daily message in 2004 and can’t seem to break the habit. He claims that in Pagosa Springs opinions are like vans: everyone has one.

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Ancient Hoi An Town – Attraction of Asia’s Leading Cultural Destination | To travel https://tavistockdevon.com/ancient-hoi-an-town-attraction-of-asias-leading-cultural-destination-to-travel/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 07:06:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/ancient-hoi-an-town-attraction-of-asias-leading-cultural-destination-to-travel/

Foreign vacationers take a bike tour around the city. (Photo: VNA)

Hanoi (VNA) – After two calm years due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Hoi An is once again lively as it is one of the two destinations selected by the provincial authorities to reopen its doors in international tourists.

Located in the lower part of Thu Bon River In the coastal plain of Quang Nam province, about 30 km south of Da Nang city, Hoi An is known in the international market by various names such as Lam Ap, Faifo, Hoai Pho and Hoi An. The only port -Southeast Asian market in Vietnam and very rare in the world, Hoi An canned nearly 1,360 architectural remains intact. These include streets, houses, meeting rooms, communal houses, pagodas, shrines, clan houses, ancient wells and tombs. They exhibit both the characteristics of traditional Vietnamese art and the convergence of Eastern and Western cultures.

The cultural and economic exchanges that took place from the 16th to the 19th century left in ancient Hoi An most forms of ancient Vietnamese architecture, bringing together traditional national arts enriched with sketches of foreign arts.

Researchers argue that Hoi An’s ancient architecture was renewed in the early 19th century, but the real starting point could be much earlier. The ancient architecture is most visible in the ancient quarter located inside the Minh An district, covering about 2 km² and housing most of the famous relics of Hoi An.

The streets of the old quarter are short, narrow and crisscrossing.

The architectural works there were mostly built from traditional materials, including brick and wood, and they do not exceed two storeys.

Hoi An Ancient Town - attraction of Asia's main cultural destination hinh anh 2Tourists experience Hoi An after two years of closure to help fight the pandemic (Photo: VNA)

It is easy for tourists to recognize the traces of time not only in the architectural design of each building but also everywhere else, moss-covered tiled roofs, walls, sculptures depicting a strange creature or an ancient story. It is a convergence of Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese and Cham artisans. Each construction still bears the cultural characteristics of many nations. Today, Hoi An is still the home of thousands of residents, serving as a living museum in terms of architecture and urban lifestyle.

Through the centuries, the customs and practices, rites, cultural and belief activities as well as traditional foods of Hoi An are still preserved and preserved with generations of former street dwellers. The city also benefits from a healthy and peaceful natural environment with small suburban villages engaged in handicrafts like carpentry and pottery.

After testing negative for COVID-19, the first foreign visitors under the “passport to vaccines” pilot program toured the ancient city on November 11.

Hoi An People’s Committee Vice Chairman Nguyen Van Lanh expressed gratitude to visitors for choosing Hoi An as the first destination of their Vietnam trip.

Hoi An Ancient Town - attraction of Asia's main cultural destination hinh anh 3Hoi An’s pedestrian streets have been well prepared to accommodate foreign vacationers (Photo: VNA)

It has taken great efforts from local authorities and the population over the past two years to be able to welcome foreign tourists again and make Hoi An a safe and friendly destination, he said, adding that ‘he expects to see Hoi An and Quang Nam at large regaining his reputation. /.

On December 4, 1999, in the city of Marrakech in Morocco, the 23rd session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee officially inscribed the ancient city of Hoi An on the list of cultural remains of the world.

He is honored by many famous travel magazines. In July 2019, with 90.39 points, Hoi An was voted by Travel and Leisure travel magazine as the most attractive city in the world that year. It is also the first tourist site in Vietnam honored by the Google Doodle.

VNA

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School reopens brings hope to St. Ann community – Jamaica Information Service https://tavistockdevon.com/school-reopens-brings-hope-to-st-ann-community-jamaica-information-service/ https://tavistockdevon.com/school-reopens-brings-hope-to-st-ann-community-jamaica-information-service/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 12:42:31 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/school-reopens-brings-hope-to-st-ann-community-jamaica-information-service/

Headmistress (Ag) of Steer Town Elementary, Junior and Secondary School in St. Ann, Jacqueline Mullings, said the resumption of the face-to-face was going well with no major issues to report.

Speaking to JIS News on Tuesday, November 9, Ms Mullings said the infant department (ages 4-5) reopened with 27 students coming out on Monday (November 8) and 30 Tuesday (November 9) out of a population of 47. .

“Although this is in its early stages, we are already seeing an increase,” Ms. Mullings noted. “The kids are excited… our teachers are excited… excited about it all… and everyone is just happy to be back.”

Steer Town Elementary, Secondary and Nursery School Principal (Ag) Jacqueline Mullings (center), seen here with teacher Charmaine Bailey (left) and babysitter Karine Christie, interacting with students at the nursery school on the school premises on Tuesday, November 9). Photo: Garwin Davis

Ms Mullings added that while it will take some time to fully acclimate to the realities of face-to-face lessons after a hiatus of almost 20 months, students, based on “what we have seen so far. now, ”seemed eager to get back to basics, happy to be physically back with their peers as well as interacting with their teachers.

She further noted that the school has a very good support system and that the teachers are ready to go the extra mile to ensure that Steer Town Primary, Secondary and Child School can return to normal. as quickly as possible, paving the way for other departments to also resume face-to-face lessons.

“Even though we’ve been out since March of last year, it seems longer,” she added. “These are the formative years… very important years. If those years aren’t captured and captured well, then we’re going to have gaps, and that’s definitely something we don’t want ”.

Steer Town Elementary, Junior and Secondary School Principal (Ag) Jacqueline Mullings (left), seen here interacting with preschool students on Tuesday 9 November. Photo: Garwin Davis

Ms Mullings also noted that students were taking online classes while away from class, grateful to parents for being very helpful and for making the transition a little easier for teachers.

She said even those who didn’t have smartphones and other electronic devices were helped by teachers who went to communities to give students materials and prepare lessons, making sure they were well equipped. to follow their schoolwork.

Principal (Ag) added that great attention is paid to health and safety guidelines where social distancing and wearing masks are mandatory and there is also special attention to how students interact with each other. others.

“We must always be aware that there is still a COVID-19 pandemic and that we have a responsibility to staff and students,” she said. “We’re talking about our babies here. We need to do everything we can to follow best practices and make sure we lead by example. “

Steer Town Elementary, Junior and Secondary School Principal (Ag) Jacqueline Mullings (left) interacts with preschool students on Tuesday, November 9. Photo: Garwin Davis

In the meantime, Steer Town resident and parent Melonie Simpson said she was happy the school has reopened, noting that “it is a symbol of hope for Steer Town and neighboring communities.”

“We are all in the same boat,” she said JIS News. “The early childhood department has reopened but we hope that the primary and secondary sections will be open soon. I have three children who go there in all the departments and it would be a big break for me as well as for them ”.

The gradual reopening of schools has started for the 2021/2022 school year with 248 of 376 primary and kindergartens in the seven regions approved for reopening.

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