lot people – Tavistock Devon http://tavistockdevon.com/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 09:19:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tavistockdevon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png lot people – Tavistock Devon http://tavistockdevon.com/ 32 32 Finding Information About Past Events Can Be Tricky | Community columns https://tavistockdevon.com/finding-information-about-past-events-can-be-tricky-community-columns/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/finding-information-about-past-events-can-be-tricky-community-columns/

It’s National New England Clam Chowder Day, Farmers!

A few years ago, as part of a joint Christmas present, I booked a trip to Boston for my husband and I. We had never been there and as a die-hard Red Sox fan he had dreamed of seeing Fenway Park. Coincidentally, they were playing the Yankees the same week as a literary event that several of my favorite authors were attending.

We set off, staying in a lovely Airbnb in Winthrop, just above Belle Isle Inlet and across the Charles River to Boston proper. It was an adventure (they don’t drive the same as us in West By God) that turned into a memorial ride to Salem, Mass. on Friday the 13th, seeing the graves of these “supposedly” accused witches, and then at the Talk Books Author Event in Burlington.

Of course, the highlight was our visit to Fenway Park, including the Green Monster, followed by a very rainy Sox vs. Yankees game (the night after a fight broke out on the mound). We had the best time sitting on the third base side with real Bostonians drinking Sam Adams and heckling throughout the game.

While the atmosphere was humid and not my cup of tea (yuck yuck), these guys made sure we had a great time. When we tell the story of our rain-delayed victory, I always think how strange it was to see a salesman running up and down the rows of fans shouting, “Chowda here!” You might get a bowl of real New England clam chowder at the baseball game! To this day, it’s something I can’t get over. You just don’t think of it as typical stadium snack food. Unfortunately I didn’t participate, but I tasted enough lobster rolls (and delicious lobster and waffle dishes) that I should have turned red and grown claws by the time we left for the end of the week.

Around the city

What a slow week in town. Nothing like a little lull to dig a little deeper into what’s going on here based on the conversations we’ve all had over the past week. I asked a few questions that my fellow farmers might be able to answer.

In the Marion County Genealogy group on Facebook, a lady asked about a plane crash in Farmington circa 1958. Well, sure, that made me feel right away! A small blurb was mentioned in the Hinton newspaper stating that 33-year-old Howard N. Johnston, a native of Canton, Ohio, died when his single-engine craft crashed and burned on a hill at about two miles south of Farmington. Does anyone remember this incident?

It happened over Labor Day weekend. If you do, write to me and let me know! I would like to share. Speaking of sharing, a very nice gentleman came to see me at the office and even brought me a little piece of Farmington history.

I should have asked him if he wanted me to say his name and I apologize, but he brought me a blank check from the Bank of Farmington. It is in pristine condition and now resides with my other perfectly preserved Farmington memorabilia. I’ve shared a photo of it on social media if you’d like to head over to Farmington’s Facebook page to take a look. I really appreciate it (and no, not because I have something Fred Priester doesn’t have in his extensive collection) thank him for taking the time to come and give me a little piece of my hometown.

A very happy birthday to Debbi and Brad Jones at Rachel celebrating this Thursday. If you were waiting, you missed a slice of Nook pizza yesterday. The girls ran out shortly after lunchtime, but Marsha said they would make enough dough to accommodate everyone the next time it was the daily special. Today she has homemade meatloaf with mashed potatoes, green beans and rolls for $12 and if you want to add a side salad you can add an extra $3 to your total. It will also be open for breakfast tomorrow from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and you can dine in or take out.

past years

Do you remember when the county superintendent would give you an elementary reading circle certificate at the end of the year from the state of W.Va. showing how many books you read during the school year? I am happy to report that as a freshman at Farmington Elementary, I read 60 books during the school year from September to May. Coincidentally, my goal on Goodreads.com this year is 50 pounds from January 1 through December 31. Let’s see if I can do it! I’m a little behind at the moment, having only read six books since the beginning of the year, but I hope to catch up this weekend.

The February 1991 primary school report card reported many accomplishments. Angie Koon, Shelly Mason and Sabrina Malone entered the Young Writer Contest. Sabrina’s story, “Small Adventure” has been submitted at the county level. Tiffany Haught and Clinton Dobbins represented us at the County Spelling Bee. Brian Roach, Melissa Filius, Angie Koon, Julia Toothman, Sabrina Malone, Chastity Evans, Jimmie Hayes, Clinton Dobbins, Tiffany Haught and Kristina Smith represented the fourth year at the Social Studies Fair. Brian, Melissa, Sabrina and Chasity all went county level. A reminder for those who don’t know. Farmington Elementary had only one classroom each grade, K-4. That’s a lot of accomplishment for a class of only 20+ students. Mr. Carpenter was a damn good teacher.

Northern News

Our ladies Huskies enter the second round of sections and will play tonight at 7 p.m. Let’s Go Huskies! Congratulations to the Hess brothers. Brody Hess and Noah Hess both made it to this week’s regional wrestling match in their respective weight classes and are now state-bound. NMHS has taken an extra step to ensure a safe environment for all students. In an effort to report bullying, harassment, and also as a tool to anonymously report student concerns, a lockable drop box is now located outside the main doors. Students, parents and guardians can use the box and it will be checked by an administrator every morning. This could be a good way to inform teachers about violence in the home, children in need, hunger or lack of proper care, as well as issues with depression and other mental health issues. .

Birthdays

Happy birthday to Ryan Elliott, Sandy Malone, Mandi Wolfe, Rachel Kittle, Brandon Fleeman, Harry Steptoe Jr., Carly Jones, Randy Elliott, Sandy Malone, Michael Devault Jr, Miranda Darrah Clark, Andy Arbogast, Beatrice Nichole, Bob Hearn, Ida Macias and Kimberly Leezer Himes.

Church News

Ash Wednesday Mass will be held March 2 at 5:30 p.m. at St. Peter’s Catholic Church and again at 7 p.m. at St. Patrick’s in Mannington. Every Thursday during Lent there will be a devotional luncheon at St. Patrick’s Parish Hall. This coming week, March 3, you can join them at noon for devotions, fellowship, and soup and crackers provided by First Baptist. Stations of the Cross will also take place every Friday during Lent in both parishes beginning March 4 at 4 p.m. in St. Patrick and 5:30 p.m. in St. Peter. Finally, in this season and always, a reminder of five times to make the sign of the cross: during personal prayer as an invocation to the Holy Trinity, when passing through a church to honor the Blessed Sacrament present inside , when you hear a siren to heal those in danger of death, passing a cemetery as a prayer for holy souls, and when you see an accident as protection for those in peril.

Final Thoughts

My heart is sad today at the events in Ukraine. I know a lot of people don’t think it’s a problem for us at W.Va., but it’s a global hurt that we will feel all over the world. Mothers should not feel the need to pin their children’s blood type on their clothes before sending them to school in the morning, lest they be injured in an attack. It’s always the innocent that hurts. Let’s use this weekend to be grateful to be at peace, to pray that we remain so, and to remember that mountaineers are always free by the grace of God. You can reach me in the office Monday mornings from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., by email at scummons@timeswv.com and by phone at 304-367-2527.

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The town of Berryville, Ark. offers $ 1,000 reward for information on vandalism https://tavistockdevon.com/the-town-of-berryville-ark-offers-1000-reward-for-information-on-vandalism/ https://tavistockdevon.com/the-town-of-berryville-ark-offers-1000-reward-for-information-on-vandalism/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 21:55:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/the-town-of-berryville-ark-offers-1000-reward-for-information-on-vandalism/

BERRYVILLE, Ark. (KY3) – A recent round of vandalism prompted the town of Berryville to offer a $ 1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of those responsible.

The latest incident took place in the newly installed public toilets in the city’s swimming pool park. Public vandalism has been a big issue lately with TikTok trends known as “sneaky licking” with children vandalizing public restrooms.

“My college daughter came home and said we couldn’t go to the bathroom on our own because of the recent TikTok, and I did say it was terribly strange,” Renee Allison said, Director of the Berryville Parks Department.

A recent round of vandalism in the city of Berryville parks has led the city to take a stand. The most recent happened at the City Pool Park.

“The heater was ripped off the wall and did quite a bit of damage,” Allison said.

And there was also spray paint on the floor. A reward of $ 1,000 is offered to anyone who presents information leading to legal action against available persons.

“New bathrooms in city parks is something we’ve been trying to put in place for a long, long time,” Allison explained. “Every mom goes to the park and wants to have fun, but it’s inevitable that someone has to use the toilet. “

“The bathrooms just opened this summer,” said Berryville Police Chief Robert Bartos. “So a lot of people were upset with the vandalism because a lot of work and a lot of taxpayer money went into taking care of it for the citizens.”

The city hopes to send a message that such actions will be considered, especially with other municipal projects currently underway, such as the town square renovations and the approval of the playground equipment. from the football complex.

“We want to strive to build the park better and make things better for the family that lives here,” Allison explained. “When we have to go so far as to reward someone for coming forward to tell us who destroyed them, it just takes away the good we can do. “

“I think if they can show that this will not be tolerated, it may reduce any future vandalism on city property,” Bartos said.

No one provided any information.

If you have any information about the incident, you should contact Berryville Police at (870) 423-3343.

To report a correction or typo, please send an email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2021 KY3. All rights reserved.

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Could the pandemic further erode the New England city reunion? | Local News https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion-local-news/ https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion-local-news/#respond Sun, 28 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion-local-news/

MIDDLESEX, Vermont – The town reunion, for centuries, has been a staple of life in New England – but the coronavirus pandemic could hasten the departure of the tradition where people come together to debate everything, from the purchase of local road equipment to multi-million dollar budgets to pressing social issues.

The basis of the town hall meeting is getting everyone together in the same room – sometimes a literal town hall, sometimes a school gymnasium – where voters will debate local issues until a decision is made.

The restrictions on in-person gatherings imposed by the pandemic make this impossible.

Some communities are delaying meetings this year until the virus is hopefully better under control. Others use pre-printed ballots to settle issues, foregoing the one-day debate altogether.

Some fear that the temporary workaround may persist even after life returns to normal.

“I would be very disappointed if people think that this is a new model because it would take us completely away from the essence of the town hall, which is the opportunity to meet with our fellow citizens, to hear directly to our elected officials, to question, to challenge them, to debate a budget and public issues in an assembled meeting, ”said former Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, who for 33 years was moderator in his Middlebury hometown.

In this March 5, 2002 file photo, citizens vote in favor of a redistribution resolution at Woodbury’s annual town hall meeting. …

But others counter that the challenges of bringing people together in a meeting in town, virus or not, limit the number of people who can attend.

In Vermont, where the traditional Town Meeting Day – the first Tuesday in March – is a public holiday, the state has only allowed cities this year to decide local issues with pre-printed ballots. Most of the cities that chose the option held remote information meetings to help voters make informed decisions.

In Middlesex, Vermont, voters on Tuesday will vote on a measure that, if approved, would allow the city to continue with preprinted ballots to decide everything from credits for the local library to payments for programs social – but the city budget.

Vic Dwire, a longtime Middlesex resident, who supports the measure, said it would allow more people to vote.

“The point of this is that a lot of people think they can’t ask questions at city meetings,” said Dwire, who is running for a seat on the Middlesex board this year. “It gives people the opportunity to participate in democracy and vote from 7am to 7pm”

But others think it would take something away from the process.

“We need empowered, face-to-face deliberations,” said Susan Clark, Town of Middlesex meeting moderator.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has said he’s not taking a stand on the choices cities make about their meetings, but he understands why some are pushing for change.

Many people cannot attend traditional town meetings, which can last all day.

“They can live in one city and work in another city and it’s hard to have free time,” Condos said. “They can have kids, a school, anything that interferes with their life. It’s not like it was 100 years ago.

In Maine, the pandemic wiped out town meetings last year for more than 400 of the state’s 486 municipalities that hold spring meetings. Thanks to an emergency order from the governor, many cities in Maine are once again using preprinted secret ballot votes this year to make decisions.

Eric Conrad of the Maine Municipal Association said more people voted by secret ballot than they attended in previous traditional town hall meetings.

“This democratic compromise is lost. But participation is better, ”he said.

Town halls evolved from the time when the first European settlers in what would become the six New England states would meet in a meeting house, usually the church, and decide all local matters. They are still used in one form or another in New England’s six states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Over the centuries, power shifted to groups of local “selected men” who were chosen to make the decisions of the communities and the system continued to evolve, said Douglas, the former governor of Vermont.

Now, some communities resort to representative municipal assemblies where residents are elected to represent their neighbors. Other communities use a combination of indoor debates, votes and pre-printed ballots for different questions. In large communities, voters are already deciding issues with pre-printed ballots.

In Massachusetts, where some of New England’s first town halls were established in the 1630s, 300 of 351 municipalities continue to hold town halls in one form or another, according to Secretary of State William’s office. Galvin.

Massachusetts lawmakers last year allowed cities to postpone their annual city meetings until the summer, allowing many to hold them outside after the initial wave of the virus ended.

In New Hampshire, traditional town hall meetings are held on the second Tuesday in March. Last year in Henniker, the municipal assembly from March was postponed to June and then July, when voters dispersed to a school.

This year, Henniker officials decided to hold a meeting on March 13, with voters spaced as far apart as possible in a gymnasium.

” I hope it will last. If we continue to have things like this then I think we will have to reconsider the situation, but hopefully this is a once in a lifetime thing and we can get back to normal, ”said Cordell Johnstone, moderator of the town of Henniker. “At this point the question is whether city meetings are a viable way to run the city and I think for most cities it is. “

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Could the pandemic further erode the New England city reunion? https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion/ https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion/#respond Fri, 26 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion/

MIDDLESEX, Vermont (AP) – The town reunion, for centuries, has been a staple of life in New England – but the coronavirus pandemic could hasten the departure of the tradition where people come together to debate everything from the purchase of local road equipment to several million dollars. from dollar budgets to pressing social issues.

The basis of the town hall meeting is to bring everyone together in the same room – sometimes a literal town hall, sometimes a school gymnasium – where voters will debate local issues until a decision is made.

The restrictions on in-person gatherings imposed by the pandemic make this impossible.

Some communities are delaying meetings this year until the virus is hopefully better under control. Others use pre-printed ballots to settle issues, foregoing the one-day debate altogether.

Some fear that the temporary workaround may persist even after life returns to normal.

“I would be very disappointed if people think that this is a new model because it would take us completely away from the essence of the municipal assembly, which is the opportunity to meet with our fellow citizens, to hear directly to our elected officials, to question, to challenge them, to debate a budget and public issues in an assembled meeting, ”said former Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, who for 33 years was moderator in his Middlebury hometown.

But others counter that the challenges of bringing people together in a meeting in town, virus or not, limit the number of people who can attend.

In Vermont, where the traditional Town Meeting Day – the first Tuesday in March – is a public holiday, the state has only allowed cities this year to decide local issues with pre-printed ballots. Most of the cities that chose the option held remote information meetings to help voters make informed decisions.

In Middlesex, Vermont, voters on Tuesday will vote on a measure that, if approved, would allow the city to continue with pre-printed ballots to decide everything from credits for the local library to payments for programs social – but the city budget.

Vic Dwire, a longtime Middlesex resident, who supports the measure, said it would allow more people to vote.

“The point is, a lot of people think they can’t ask any questions at city meetings,” said Dwire, who is running for a seat on the Middlesex board this year. “It gives people the opportunity to participate in democracy and vote from 7am to 7pm”

But others think it would take something away from the process.

“We need empowered face-to-face deliberations,” said Susan Clark, Town of Middlesex meeting moderator.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has said he’s not taking a stand on the choices cities make about their meetings, but he understands why some are pushing for change.

Many people cannot attend traditional town meetings, which can last all day.

“They can live in one city and work in another city and it’s hard to have free time,” Condos said. “They can have kids, a school, anything that interferes with their life. It’s not like it was 100 years ago.

In Maine, the pandemic wiped out town meetings last year for more than 400 of the state’s 486 municipalities that hold meetings in the spring. Thanks to an emergency order from the governor, many cities in Maine are once again using preprinted secret ballot votes this year to make decisions.

Eric Conrad of the Maine Municipal Association said more people voted by secret ballot than they attended previous traditional town hall meetings.

“This democratic compromise is lost. But participation is better, ”he said.

City meetings evolved from the time when the first European settlers in what would become the six New England states would meet in a meeting house, usually the church, and decide all local matters. They are still used in one form or another in New England’s six states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Over the centuries, power shifted to groups of local “selected men” who were chosen to make the decisions of the communities and the system continued to evolve, said Douglas, the former governor of Vermont.

Now, some communities use representative municipal assemblies where residents are elected to represent their neighbors. Other communities use a combination of indoor debates, votes and pre-printed ballots for different questions. In large communities, voters are already deciding issues with pre-printed ballots.

In Massachusetts, where some of New England’s first town halls were established in the 1630s, 300 of 351 municipalities continue to hold town halls in one form or another, according to Secretary of State William’s office. Galvin.

Massachusetts lawmakers last year allowed cities to postpone their annual city meetings until the summer, allowing many to hold them outside after the initial wave of the virus ended.

In New Hampshire, traditional town hall meetings are held on the second Tuesday in March. Last year in Henniker, the municipal assembly from March was postponed to June and then July, when voters dispersed to a school.

This year, Henniker officials decided to hold a meeting on March 13, with voters spaced as far apart as possible in a gymnasium.

” I hope it will last. If we keep having things like this then I think we will have to reconsider the situation, but hopefully this is a once in a lifetime thing and we can get back to normal, ”said Cordell Johnston, moderator of the town of Henniker. “At this point the question is whether city meetings are a viable way to run the city and I think for most cities it is. “

___

Associated Press reporters David Sharp in Portland, Maine, Phil Marcelo in Stoneham, Massachusetts, and Holly Ramer, in Concord, New Hampshire, contributed to this report.

___

This story corrects the spelling of the town moderator’s name from Henniker to Cordell Johnston, not Cordell Johnstone.

]]>
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Pandemic could further erode New England city reunion https://tavistockdevon.com/pandemic-could-further-erode-new-england-city-reunion/ https://tavistockdevon.com/pandemic-could-further-erode-new-england-city-reunion/#respond Fri, 26 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/pandemic-could-further-erode-new-england-city-reunion/

MIDDLESEX, Vermont – The town reunion, for centuries, has been a staple of life in New England – but the coronavirus pandemic could hasten the departure of the tradition where people come together to debate everything, from the purchase of local road equipment to multi-million dollar budgets to pressing social issues.

The basis of the town hall meeting is to bring everyone together in the same room – sometimes a literal town hall, sometimes a school gymnasium – where voters will debate local issues until a decision is made.

The restrictions on in-person gatherings imposed by the pandemic make this impossible.

Some communities are delaying meetings this year until the virus is hopefully better under control. Others use pre-printed ballots to settle issues, foregoing the one-day debate altogether.

Some fear that the temporary workaround may persist even after life returns to normal.

“I would be very disappointed if people think that this is a new model because it would take us completely away from the essence of the municipal assembly, which is the opportunity to meet with our fellow citizens, to hear directly to our elected officials, to question, to challenge them, to debate a budget and public issues in an assembled meeting, ”said former Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, who for 33 years was moderator in his Middlebury hometown.

But others counter that the challenges of bringing people together in a meeting in town, virus or not, limit the number of people who can attend.

In Vermont, where the traditional Town Meeting Day – the first Tuesday in March – is a statutory holiday, the state has only allowed cities this year to decide local issues with pre-printed ballots. Most of the cities that chose the option held remote information meetings to help voters make informed decisions.

In Middlesex, Vermont, voters on Tuesday will vote on a measure that, if approved, would allow the city to continue with pre-printed ballots to decide everything from credits for the local library to payments for programs social – but the city budget.

Vic Dwire, a longtime Middlesex resident, who supports the measure, said it would allow more people to vote.

“The point is, a lot of people think they can’t ask any questions at city meetings,” said Dwire, who is running for a seat on the Middlesex board this year. “It gives people the opportunity to participate in democracy and vote from 7am to 7pm”

But others think it would take something away from the process.

“We need empowered face-to-face deliberations,” said Susan Clark, Town of Middlesex meeting moderator.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has said he’s not taking a stand on the choices cities make about their meetings, but he understands why some are pushing for change.

Many people cannot attend traditional town meetings, which can last all day.

“They can live in one city and work in another city and it’s hard to have free time,” Condos said. “They can have kids, a school, anything that interferes with their life. It’s not like it was 100 years ago.

In Maine, the pandemic wiped out town meetings last year for more than 400 of the state’s 486 municipalities that hold spring meetings. Thanks to an emergency order from the governor, many cities in Maine are once again using preprinted secret ballot votes this year to make decisions.

Eric Conrad of the Maine Municipal Association said more people voted by secret ballot than they attended in previous traditional town halls.

“This democratic compromise is lost. But participation is better, ”he said.

Town halls evolved from the time when the first European settlers in what would become the six New England states would meet in a meeting house, usually the church, and decide all local matters. They are still used in one form or another in New England’s six states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Over the centuries, power shifted to groups of local “selected men” who were chosen to make the decisions of the communities and the system continued to evolve, said Douglas, the former governor of Vermont.

Now, some communities resort to representative municipal assemblies where residents are elected to represent their neighbors. Other communities use a combination of indoor debates, votes and pre-printed ballots for different questions. In large communities, voters are already deciding issues with pre-printed ballots.

In Massachusetts, where some of New England’s first town halls were established in the 1630s, 300 of 351 municipalities continue to hold town halls in one form or another, according to Secretary of State William’s office. Galvin.

Massachusetts lawmakers last year allowed cities to postpone their annual city meetings until the summer, allowing many to hold them outside after the initial wave of the virus ended.

In New Hampshire, traditional town hall meetings are held on the second Tuesday in March. Last year in Henniker, the municipal assembly from March was postponed to June and then July, when voters dispersed to a school.

This year, Henniker officials decided to hold a meeting on March 13, with voters spaced as far apart as possible in a gymnasium.

” I hope it will last. If we keep having things like this then I think we will have to reconsider the situation, but hopefully this is a once in a lifetime thing and we can get back to normal, ”said Cordell Johnstone, moderator of the town of Henniker. “At that time, it is [a] whether the city meeting is a viable way to run the city and I think for most cities it is. “

Wilson Ring, The Associated Press. Associated Press reporters David Sharp in Portland, Maine, Phil Marcelo in Stoneham, Massachusetts, and Holly Ramer, in Concord, New Hampshire, contributed to this report.

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Could the pandemic further erode the New England city reunion? | Vermont News https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion-vermont-news/ Fri, 26 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/could-the-pandemic-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion-vermont-news/

By WILSON RING, Associated Press

MIDDLESEX, Vermont (AP) – The town reunion, for centuries, has been a staple of life in New England – but the coronavirus pandemic could hasten the departure of the tradition where people come together to debate everything from the purchase of local road equipment to several million dollars. from dollar budgets to pressing social issues.

The basis of the town hall meeting is getting everyone together in the same room – sometimes a literal town hall, sometimes a school gymnasium – where voters will debate local issues until a decision is made.

The restrictions on in-person gatherings imposed by the pandemic make this impossible.

Some communities are delaying meetings this year until the virus is hopefully better under control. Others use pre-printed ballots to settle issues, foregoing the one-day debate altogether.

Political cartoons

Some fear that the temporary workaround may persist even after life returns to normal.

“I would be very disappointed if people thought that this is a new model because it would take us completely away from the essence of the municipal assembly, which is the opportunity to meet with our fellow citizens, to hear directly to our elected officials, to question, to challenge them, to debate a budget and public issues in an assembled meeting, ”said former Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, who for 33 years was moderator in his Middlebury hometown.

But others counter that the challenges of bringing people together in a city meeting, virus or not, limit the number of people who can attend.

In Vermont, where the traditional Town Meeting Day – the first Tuesday in March – is a public holiday, the state has only allowed cities this year to decide local issues with pre-printed ballots. Most of the cities that chose the option held remote information meetings to help voters make informed decisions.

In Middlesex, Vermont, voters will vote on Tuesday on a measure that, if approved, would allow the city to continue with pre-printed ballots to decide everything – from credits for the local library to payments for social programs – but the city budget.

Vic Dwire, a longtime Middlesex resident, who supports the measure, said it would allow more people to vote.

“The point is, a lot of people think they can’t ask any questions at city meetings,” said Dwire, who is running for a seat on the Middlesex board this year. “It gives people the opportunity to participate in democracy and vote from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm”

But others think it would take something away from the process.

“We need empowered face-to-face deliberations,” said Susan Clark, Town of Middlesex meeting moderator.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has said he’s not taking a stand on the choices cities make about their meetings, but he understands why some are pushing for change.

Many people cannot attend traditional town meetings, which can last all day.

“They can live in one city and work in another city and it’s hard to have free time,” Condos said. “They can have kids, a school, anything that interferes with their life. It’s not like it was 100 years ago.

In Maine, the pandemic wiped out town meetings last year for more than 400 of the state’s 486 municipalities that hold spring meetings. Thanks to an emergency governor’s order, many cities in Maine are once again using preprinted secret ballot votes this year to make decisions.

Eric Conrad of the Maine Municipal Association said more people voted by secret ballot than at previous traditional town hall meetings.

“This democratic compromise is lost. But participation is better, ”he said.

City meetings evolved from the time when the first European settlers in what would become the six New England states would meet in a meeting house, usually the church, and decide all local matters. They are still used in one form or another in New England’s six states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Over the centuries, power shifted to groups of local “selected men” who were chosen to make the decisions of the communities and the system continued to evolve, said Douglas, the former governor of Vermont.

Now, some communities resort to representative municipal assemblies where residents are elected to represent their neighbors. Other communities use a combination of floor debates, votes, and pre-printed ballots for different questions. In large communities, voters are already deciding issues with pre-printed ballots.

In Massachusetts, where some of New England’s first town halls were established in the 1630s, 300 of 351 municipalities continue to hold town halls in one form or another, according to Secretary of State William’s office. Galvin.

Massachusetts lawmakers last year allowed cities to postpone their annual city meetings until the summer, allowing many to hold them outside after the initial wave of the virus ended.

In New Hampshire, traditional town hall meetings are held on the second Tuesday in March. Last year in Henniker, the municipal assembly from March was postponed to June and then July, when voters dispersed to a school.

This year, Henniker officials decided to hold a meeting on March 13, with voters spaced as far apart as possible in a gymnasium.

” I hope it will last. If we keep having things like this then I think we will have to reconsider the situation, but hopefully this is a once in a lifetime thing and we can get back to normal, ”said Cordell Johnstone, moderator of the town of Henniker. “At this point the question is whether city meetings are a viable way to run the city and I think for most cities it is. “

Associated Press reporters David Sharp in Portland, Maine, Phil Marcelo in Stoneham, Massachusetts, and Holly Ramer, in Concord, New Hampshire, contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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How the pandemic could further erode the New England city reunion https://tavistockdevon.com/how-the-pandemic-could-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion/ Fri, 26 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/how-the-pandemic-could-further-erode-the-new-england-city-reunion/

Reuniting the town, for centuries, has been a staple of life in New England – but the coronavirus pandemic could hasten the departure of the tradition where people come together to debate everything from buying to local road equipment with multi-million dollar budgets to pressing social problems.

The basis of the town hall meeting is getting everyone together in the same room – sometimes a literal town hall, sometimes a school gymnasium – where voters will discuss local issues until a decision is made.

The restrictions on in-person gatherings imposed by the pandemic make this impossible.

Some communities are delaying meetings this year until the virus is hopefully better under control. Others use pre-printed ballots to settle issues, foregoing the one-day debate altogether.

Some fear that the temporary workaround may persist even after life returns to normal.

“I would be very disappointed if people thought that this is a new model because it would take us completely away from the essence of the municipal assembly, which is the opportunity to meet with our fellow citizens, to hear directly to our elected officials, to question, to challenge them, to debate a budget and public issues in an assembled meeting, ”said former Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, who for 33 years was moderator in his Middlebury hometown.

In this March 11, 2008 file photo, moderator Dick Kipperman, right, accepts a resident’s vote at the city’s annual meeting in Springfield, NH (Jim Cole / AP File)

But others counter that the challenges of bringing people together in a meeting in town, virus or not, limit the number of people who can attend.

In Vermont, where the traditional Town Meeting Day – the first Tuesday in March – is a public holiday, the state has only allowed cities this year to decide local issues with pre-printed ballots. Most of the cities that chose the option held remote information meetings to help voters make informed decisions.

In Middlesex, Vermont, voters will vote on Tuesday on a measure that, if approved, would allow the city to continue with pre-printed ballots to decide everything from credits for the local library to payments for social programs – but the city budget.

Vic Dwire, a longtime Middlesex resident, who supports the measure, said it would allow more people to vote.

“The point is, a lot of people think they can’t ask any questions at city meetings,” said Dwire, who is running for a seat on the Middlesex board this year. “It gives people the opportunity to participate in democracy and vote from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm”

In this March 5, 2002 file photo, citizens vote to support a redistribution resolution at the town's annual meeting in Woodbury, Vt. (Toby Talbot / AP File)
In this March 5, 2002 file photo, citizens vote to support a redistribution resolution at the town’s annual meeting in Woodbury, Vt. (Toby Talbot / AP File)

But others think it would take something away from the process.

“We need empowered, face-to-face deliberations,” said Susan Clark, Town of Middlesex meeting moderator.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has said he’s not taking a stand on the choices cities make about their meetings, but he understands why some are pushing for change.

Many people cannot attend traditional town meetings, which can last all day.

“They can live in one city and work in another city and it’s hard to have free time,” Condos said. “They can have kids, a school, anything that interferes with their life. It’s not like it was 100 years ago.

In Maine, the pandemic wiped out town meetings last year for more than 400 of the state’s 486 municipalities that hold spring meetings. Thanks to an emergency governor’s order, many cities in Maine are once again using preprinted secret ballot votes this year to make decisions.

“The point is, a lot of people think they can’t ask questions at city meetings. It gives people a chance to participate in democracy … “

Eric Conrad of the Maine Municipal Association said more people voted by secret ballot than at previous traditional town hall meetings.

“This democratic compromise is lost. But participation is better, ”he said.

City meetings evolved from the time when the first European settlers in what would become the six New England states would meet in a meeting house, usually the church, and decide all local matters. They are still used in one form or another in New England’s six states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

In this June 16, 2020 file photo, residents are waving pink cards to vote on an issue at the annual town hall meeting held on the high school football field to ensure social distancing due to concerns over COVID- 19, in North Andover, Mass.  It was the first municipal assembly held outside since the municipal assemblies began in North Andover in 1646. (Elise Amendola / AP File)
In this June 16, 2020 file photo, residents are waving pink cards to vote on an issue at the annual town hall meeting held on the high school football field to ensure social distancing due to concerns over COVID- 19, in North Andover, Mass. It was the first municipal assembly held outside since the municipal assemblies began in North Andover in 1646. (Elise Amendola / AP File)

Over the centuries, power shifted to groups of local “selected men” who were chosen to make the decisions of the communities and the system continued to evolve, said Douglas, the former governor of Vermont.

Now, some communities use representative municipal assemblies where residents are elected to represent their neighbors. Other communities use a combination of floor debates, votes and pre-printed ballots for different questions. In large communities, voters are already deciding issues with pre-printed ballots.

In Massachusetts, where some of New England’s first town halls were established in the 1630s, 300 of 351 municipalities continue to hold town halls in one form or another, according to Secretary of State William’s office. Galvin.

Massachusetts lawmakers last year allowed cities to postpone their annual city meetings until the summer, allowing many to hold them outside after the initial wave of the virus ended.

In New Hampshire, traditional town hall meetings are held on the second Tuesday in March. Last year in Henniker, the municipal assembly from March was postponed to June and then July, when voters dispersed to a school.

This year, Henniker officials decided to hold a meeting on March 13, with voters spaced as far apart as possible in a gymnasium.

” I hope it will last. If we continue to have things like this then I think we will have to reconsider the situation, but hopefully this is a once in a lifetime thing and we can get back to normal, ”said Cordell Johnstone, moderator of the town of Henniker. “At this point the question is whether city meetings are a viable way to run the city and I think for most cities it is. “

Associated Press reporters David Sharp in Portland, Maine, Phil Marcelo in Stoneham, Massachusetts, and Holly Ramer, in Concord, New Hampshire, contributed to this report.

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Valley News – Pandemic further erodes New England town meeting tradition https://tavistockdevon.com/valley-news-pandemic-further-erodes-new-england-town-meeting-tradition/ Fri, 26 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/valley-news-pandemic-further-erodes-new-england-town-meeting-tradition/

MIDDLESEX, Vt. – The town meeting, for centuries, has been a staple of New England life – but the coronavirus pandemic could hasten the departure from the tradition where people gather to debate everything from buying equipment local truck with budgets of several million dollars for urgent social problems.

The basis of the town hall is to get everyone together in the same room – sometimes a literal town hall, sometimes a school gymnasium – where voters will discuss local issues until a decision is made.

Restrictions on in-person gatherings imposed by the pandemic make this impossible.

Some communities are delaying meetings this year until the virus is hopefully better contained. Others use pre-printed ballots to decide issues, forgoing the day-long debate altogether.

Some are concerned that the temporary workaround will persist even after it’s back to normal.

“I would be very disappointed if people think this is a new model because it would take us completely away from the essence of the town meeting, which is an opportunity to meet with our fellow voters, to hear directly from our elected officials, to question, to challenge them, to debate a budget and public issues in an assembled meeting,” said former Vermont Governor Jim Douglas, who served as a moderator for 33 years in his hometown of Middlebury.

But others counter that the challenges of bringing people together at a town meeting, virus or not, limit the number of people who can attend.

In Vermont, where the traditional Town Meeting Day — the first Tuesday in March — is a holiday, the state this year allowed cities only to decide local issues with pre-printed ballots. Most cities that have chosen this option have held remote information meetings to help voters make informed decisions.

In Middlesex, Vermont, voters will vote Tuesday on a measure that, if approved, would force the city to continue with pre-printed ballots to decide everything — from credits for the local library to payments for social programs. – but the city budget .

Long-time Middlesex resident Vic Dwire, who supports the measure, said it would allow more people to vote.

“The fact is that a lot of people think they can’t ask any questions at town meetings,” said Dwire, who is running for a seat on the Middlesex board this year. “It gives people the opportunity to participate in democracy and vote from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.”

But others think it would take something away from the process.

“We need face-to-face and empowered deliberations,” said Middlesex Town Meeting moderator Susan Clark.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos said he takes no position on the choices cities make about their meetings, but he understands why some are pushing for change.

Many people cannot attend traditional town meetings, which can last all day.

“They can live in one city and work in another city, and it’s hard to have free time,” Condos said. “They can have children, go to school, whatever interferes with their lives. It’s not like it was 100 years ago. »

In Maine, the pandemic last year eliminated town meetings for more than 400 of the state’s 486 municipalities that hold spring meetings. Thanks to an emergency order from the governor, many cities in Maine are using pre-printed secret ballot votes again this year to make decisions.

Eric Conrad of the Maine Municipal Association said more people voted by secret ballot than have attended previous traditional town meetings.

“This democratic compromise is lost. But participation is better,” he said.

Town assemblies evolved from the days when early European settlers in what would become the six states of New England met in a meeting house, usually the church, and decided all local matters. They are still used in one form or another in all six New England states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Over the centuries, power was transferred to groups of local “selected men” who were chosen to make the decisions of the communities and the system continued to evolve, said Douglas, the former governor of Vermont.

Now, some communities use representative municipal assemblies where residents are elected to represent their neighbours. Other communities use a combination of in-room debates, votes, and pre-printed ballots for different issues. In larger communities, voters already decide issues with pre-printed ballots.

In Massachusetts, where some of New England’s first town assemblies were established in the 1630s, 300 of 351 townships continue to hold town assemblies in one form or another, according to Secretary of State William’s office. Galvin.

Last year, Massachusetts lawmakers allowed cities to postpone their annual town hall meetings until the summer, allowing many to hold them outdoors after the initial wave of the virus subsided.

In New Hampshire, traditional town meetings are held on the second Tuesday in March. Last year in Henniker, the March town meeting was postponed to June and then July, when voters scattered at a school.

This year, Henniker officials decided to hold a meeting on March 13, with voters spaced out as much as possible in a gymnasium.

“Hopefully it will last. If we continue to have things like this then I think we will have to re-examine the situation, but hopefully this is a once in a lifetime thing and we can get back to the normal,” said Henniker Town Moderator Cordell Johnstone. “At this point it’s a question of whether the town meeting is a viable way to run the town and I think for most towns that’s is the case.”

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Darien, Connecticut: an old New England town with a busy social life https://tavistockdevon.com/darien-connecticut-an-old-new-england-town-with-a-busy-social-life/ https://tavistockdevon.com/darien-connecticut-an-old-new-england-town-with-a-busy-social-life/#respond Wed, 05 Dec 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/darien-connecticut-an-old-new-england-town-with-a-busy-social-life/

It was during an inspection of their 1920s colony home in Darien, Connecticut that Josh Peschko felt that he and his wife, Kristy, had chosen not only the right city, but the right one. district.

“School had just come out, and there were kids coming out of every nook and cranny cutting our lawn and everyone’s lawn,” said Mr. Peschko, 36, an asset manager, describing the scene outside their three bedroom home, which is located between Holmes Elementary School and Woodland Park. “There are no fences and we are right in the middle. It’s a shared space, so of course you have to like that sort of thing.

Since moving into the home they bought for $ 985,000 in 2016, the Peschkos have embraced the community feel of their new neighborhood and everything else in this 14.9 square mile coastal county town. from Fairfield. The boys who live nearby come to play with their 4-year-old son, Hudson, while the girls in the neighborhood want to help feed their 1-year-old daughter, Berkeley, he said. And thanks to a program hosted by the YWCA Newcomers Club, the Peschkos have attended a number of dinners with other newcomers in Darien.

Like many young families who found their way to this well-heeled city of about 22,000, the Peschkos were drawn to the school system, which consistently ranks among the highest in the state. Others are drawn to the city’s natural beauty, its easy access to New York City, and its active social, artistic and sporting cultures.

“We’re a sports-oriented community for sure,” said Doug Milne, a real estate broker with Houlihan Lawrence who has lived in Darien most of his life. “A lot of people who come here don’t know anyone, so they put their kids into youth football at age 4 and they make lifelong friends.”

Colleen Thompson said she feared she might not have a social life when she and her husband, Jon, decided to move out of their one-bedroom apartment in Lower Manhattan earlier this year and move to Darien.

“I was intimidated by how we were going to make friends, thinking that everyone would be completely cut off,” said Ms. Thompson, 31, a fundraiser for the museum. “But we’ve found tons of people who are like us, with the same nervousness, wondering how they’re going to meet.”

While the Thompson’s initially thought they wanted an older home, they realized they knew nothing about the renovation and in March purchased a six-bedroom, four-bathroom Cape Cod-style home. and a half on the waterfront, built in 2012, for $ 5.775 million.

They now enjoy taking their Maltese, Ralph, for a walk along the Rings End Bridge and Weed Beach, where Cove Harbor flows into the Long Island Strait. And Ms Thompson recently found out she was pregnant.

“There are so many meetings for new parents,” she said. “Stroller rides; mommy workouts, where you bring your baby; mother’s night, when you can leave the baby at home. Now we just need the baby to be able to participate in all of these things. “

From grand homes along the coast to historic homes in the woods, Darien offers a wide variety of desirable accommodations.

Inland, towards Merritt Parkway, older homes on large wooded properties share the neighborhood with the Ox Ridge Hunt Club, Wee Burn Country Club, and the Country Club of Darien, each of which hosts equestrian competitions. local and national.

Closer to the town center, near the border with the neighboring town of Stamford, the houses and grounds are slightly smaller. And along the city’s 16.5 miles of coastline, where peninsulas jut in and out of Long Island Sound, are multi-million dollar homes. The coast is also home to two public beaches, as well as the Darien Boat Club, the Noroton Yacht Club and the Tokeneke beach and tennis club.

With four exits on I-95 and a busy shopping stretch of Boston Post Road that runs through the city, Darien has a vibrant, if not particularly modern, downtown core. That will likely change with final zoning board approval in late November of a mixed-use project on a 7.17-acre triangle of underused land at the foot of Exit 11 of I-95.

Scheduled to be inaugurated next spring or summer, the nine-building project will add 116 apartments, 80,000 square feet of offices, 32 stores, seven restaurants and an urban park. David Genovese, Managing Director of Baywater Properties, one of the developers, said the generous site gave them a unique opportunity.

“In an old New England town like this, it’s very rare that you can create a critical mass that allows you to rethink the whole downtown experience,” he said. “We wanted to bring back to the community what used to happen, by creating public spaces where people can interact.”

Mr Genovese said he hopes the apartments will give empty occupants a chance to stay in town, while Mr Milne sees the development, with its “New York vibe”, attracting young residents.

At the end of November, there were 206 houses and 17 condominiums on the market in Darien. According to the SmartMLS, the median selling price of a home in 2018, through November 27, was $ 1.385 million, down from the median selling price of $ 1.42 million during the same 11 month period in 2017.

The cheapest house currently available is a 700 square foot cottage built in 1930, with one bedroom and one bathroom, priced at $ 359,000. The most expensive is the Ziegler Steinkraus Waterfront Estate, built in the early 1900s on 63.5 acres of a private island, with a 13,015 square foot main house, guest cottages and an equestrian center, listed for $ 120 million.

Suzanne Okie, an agent for Halstead Real Estate, said the home stock is currently plentiful and sellers are willing to negotiate the price. She attributed this buyer’s market, among other things, to the uncertainty surrounding the recent election.

“People are not rushing to buy their next home,” she said. “It was a wait-and-see environment as everyone is looking to see how the new tax laws will affect them.”

Participation is key to living in Darien, whether it’s watching your children compete in sports programs offered by schools and the city; volunteer in one of the many charitable, community, cultural or environmental awareness programs; or join one of the three golf clubs, two yacht clubs or a beach, tennis, hunting, garden or ice hockey club.

Keeping up with the busy social circuit requires a schedule like the one published in the Darien Guide for Newcomers, which includes events like the Darien Library Spring Gala, the Summer Concert Series at Grove Street Plaza, the Ox Ridge Charity Horse Show and the Turkey Bowl. , the football showdown between Darien High School and rival New Canaan High School took place on Thanksgiving Day.

About 4,800 students – 85% of Darien’s school-aged children – attend the town’s five elementary, middle and high schools.

Darien High School, which enrolls 1,354 students, has repeatedly ranked at or near the top of the state on SAT scores and other measures of achievement. In 2017-18, the school’s average SAT scores were 601 in reading and 605 in math, compared to state averages of 524 and 507.

The high school sports program is also popular, and the school campus, built in 2008, features grass sports fields and a state-of-the-art stadium.

Nearby private schools include Greens Farms Academy in Westport, for Kindergarten to Grade 12, and New Canaan Country School, for Kindergarten to Grade 9.

The New Haven line of the Metro-North Railroad has two stops in Darien, from where it takes about an hour to get to New York. Tickets purchased on the train from either station cost $ 18 (or $ 21 during rush hour) or $ 11.50 ($ 15.25 during rush hour) in advance. A monthly ticket costs $ 335.

Darien is about 40 miles northeast of New York; driving on I-95 or the Merritt Parkway takes about an hour to an hour and a half, depending on traffic.

“Gentleman’s Agreement,” Laura Z. Hobson’s bestselling 1947 novel, is set in Darien and neighboring New Canaan, and focuses on an undercover journalist who denounces American anti-Semitism. The book was adapted into a film, starring Gregory Peck, who won the Oscar for Best Picture.

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Neighbors in Mabel Street, Westhoughton, furious after the street was omitted from the city guide https://tavistockdevon.com/neighbors-in-mabel-street-westhoughton-furious-after-the-street-was-omitted-from-the-city-guide/ https://tavistockdevon.com/neighbors-in-mabel-street-westhoughton-furious-after-the-street-was-omitted-from-the-city-guide/#respond Sun, 16 Jul 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://tavistockdevon.com/neighbors-in-mabel-street-westhoughton-furious-after-the-street-was-omitted-from-the-city-guide/

THE NEIGHBORS were shocked to find their street was missing from the new Westhoughton Town Guide.

The document was released to residents recently, but his map had missed several side streets and avenues near Daisy Hill station, including Mabel Street, Hunt’s Bank, Pine Grove, and Chestnut Drive – and some Mabel Street residents were not satisfied. of the omission.

In a letter to The Bolton News, Victoria Powlton-Jones, 45, said: “It is with great interest as we flip through the new Westhoughton City Guide for 2017-2019 my husband and I have noticed that our street where we live has been completely omitted from the city map.

“Mabel Street should appear on the Leigh Road map just before Daisy Hill station. Does this omission mean we are not liable for council tax?

“Or maybe this explains the reason for the council’s lack of interest in road and pavement repairs and the appalling parking situations we find ourselves in every day with the train station overflowing. . ”

Ms Powlton-Jones later told the Bolton News that she had watched the guidebook at least half a dozen times and could not spot Mabel Street anywhere.

She added: “It comes right on top of everything else – the street is an absolute mess, including the sidewalks.

“We’re right next to Daisy Hill station and we have people here double parking in the lane. It’s a nightmare to get out.”

Roanna Kaleni, also from Mabel Street, called the omission “disturbing” and said it made her feel “insignificant”.

She said: “I obviously think the people who made the map should know that there is a Mabel Street.

“It’s actually a main street because a lot of people park here for the train station. We can’t even park our car because it’s so crowded.”

Cllr Ryan Battersby, Deputy Head of Westhoughton City Council, said: “This is just a representative example of where the places of interest are. If we were to put every street there it would be way too small to fit. distinguish all of the streets.

“It’s meant to be a representation rather than a detailed map.”

The guide was delivered to all addresses in Westhoughton.

It will soon be available for free for people to pick up from locations, including City Hall.

For more information, visit bolton.gov.uk/westhoughton

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